.United States Army - Ribbon Appurtenances.


Victory Medal, World War I

WW1 Victory Medal Devices  RWD PLOESSL


Citation Stars  

By Act of Congress, 09 JUL 1918, a 3/16-inch silver 'Citation Star' was authorized to denote receipt of a citation for gallantry in action, in the First World War and retroactive to the Civil War, of a degree less than that required for award of the Medal of Honor or the Distinguished Service Cross. Citation Stars take precedence and are to be worn above and to the wearer's right of other devices. On 08 AUG 1932, Congress revised the Act to create the Silver Star medal. The new medal incorporated the Silver Citation Star as its central feature. Veterans were authorized the replacement decoration, but had to discontinue wear of Citation Stars on their Victory Medal (or other Service Medals for U.S.N. and U.S.M.C. personnel).



Battle Clasps  

Bronze clasps, 1/8-inch by 1-1/2 inches, with the names of the thirteen campaigns of the U.S. Army during the First World War and one titled "Defensive Sector", worn on the suspension ribbon of the Victory Medal. These are distinguished from Service Clasps by the star at each end of the inscription. Battle Clasps denote actual participation in or direct support of troops involved in each campaign.

★ CAMBRAI ★
20 NOV - 04 DEC 1917
★ SOMME DEFENSIVE ★
21 MAR - 06 APR 1918
★ LYS ★
09 - 27 APR 1918
★ AISNE ★
27 MAY - 05 JUN 1918
★ MONTDIDIER-NOYON ★
09 - 13 JUN 1918
★ CHAMPAGNE-MARNE ★
18 JUL - 06 AUG 1918
★ AISNE-MARNE ★
15 - 18 JUL 1918
★ SOMME OFFENSIVE ★
08 AUG - 11 NOV 1918
★ OISE-AISNE ★
18 AUG - 11 NOV 1918
★ YPRES-LYS ★
19 AUG - 11 NOV 1918
★ ST. MIHIEL ★
12 - 16 SEP 1918
★ MEUSE-ARGONNE ★
26 SEP - 11 NOV 1918
★ VITTORIA VENETO ★
24 OCT - 04 NOV 1918
★ DEFENSIVE SECTOR ★
~

A bronze Service Star is worn on the service ribbon of the Victory Medal in lieu of the clasp.



  
 Service Clasps  

Bronze clasps, 1/8-inch by 1-1/2 inches, with the name of the country of service during the First World War, worn on the suspension ribbon of the Victory Medal, when no Battle Clasps were awarded. These are distinguished from Battle Clasps by the lack of the star at each end of the inscription. Service Clasps denote service of at least 30 days in the country inscribed.

( ENGLAND )
( FRANCE )
( ITALY )
( RUSSIA )
( SIBERIA )

There are no corresponding Service Stars for the service ribbon.

 




Additional Clasps

Additional Clasps  RWD PLOESSL



Foreign Service Clasp  

Bronze clasp, 1/8-inch by 1-1/2 inches, worn on the suspension ribbon of the American Defense Service Medal to denote service outside of the continental limits of the United States during the qualification period of the medal. This includes members of operating crews of sailing vessels and aircraft making, and actually participating in, regular and frequent trips over ocean waters; even though they may have been based within the continental United States. Not more than one such clasp is authorized.

A 3/16-inch bronze Service Star is worn on the service ribbon of the medal in lieu of the clasp. 



Germany and Japan Clasps  

Bronze clasps, 1/8-inch by 1-1/2 inches, worn on the suspension ribbon of the Army of Occupation Medal to denote occupation service in Europe and the Far East, respectively. Clasps bearing other inscriptions are not authorized. Veterans who served in both Europe and the Far East during occupation may wear both clasps on the suspension ribbon [and have popularly worn a 3/16-inch bronze Service Star on the service ribbon to denote award of both].

The Berlin Airlift Device is also worn on both the suspension and service ribbons of the Army of Occupation Medal, above or to the wearer's right of all other devices.


   


Silver Wintered Over Disc on ASM service ribbon   Wintered Over Disc and Clasp   Silver Wintered Over Clasp on ASM suspension ribbon

Worn on the service and suspension ribbons of the Antarctic Service Medal by personnel who remain on the Antarctic Continent during the winter months. The disc is 5/16-inch in diameter, with an outline of the Antarctic Continent inscribed, it is worn centered on the service ribbon. A metal clasp with the words "WINTERED OVER" is worn on the suspension ribbon.

These are awarded in:
  • Bronze for the first winter
  • Gold for the second winter
  • Silver for personnel who winter over three or more times
Wintered Over Discs & Clasps

Not more than one disc or clasp will be worn on the ribbon.





Current Appurtenances

Current Appurtenances   RWD PLOESSL



"V" for Valor  Device  

There are several decorations awarded by the U.S. Army which are earned for achievement and service or for valor and heroism. To distinguish the award of the decorations for valor, a bronze "V" device is attached. These decorations are:

V The Bronze Star
V The Air Medal
V The Joint Service Commendation Medal
V The Army Commendation Medal

No more than one "V" Device may be worn on any ribbon.



"C" for Combat  Device  

There are several decorations awarded by the U.S. Army which are earned for achievement and service or for valor and heroism. To distinguish the award for meritorious service under combat conditions, a bronze "C" device is attached. These decorations are:

C The Air Medal
C The Joint Service Commendation Medal
C The Army Commendation Medal

No more than one "C" Device may be worn on any ribbon. (Not in effect until 2017)




"R" for Remote  Device  

There are several decorations awarded by the U.S. Army which are earned for achievement and service. To distinguish the award for remote, but direct impact on combat operations, a bronze "R" device is attached. These decorations are:

R The Meritorious Service Medal
R The Joint Service Achievement Medal
R The Army Achievement Medal

No more than one "R" Device may be worn on any ribbon. (Not in effect until 2017)





Oak Leaf Clusters

The bronze Oak Leaf Cluster is awarded to and worn by Army and Air Force personnel on all U.S. decorations, except the
Air Medal
, to denote the second and subsequent awards.  A silver Oak Leaf Cluster is worn in lieu of five bronze. 
OLC's are also worn on unit citations and the Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal for the same purpose.


  


Good Conduct Medal Knots  

A metal clasp, 1/8-inch by 1-3/8-inches; of bronze, silver, or gold is worn on the service
and suspension ribbons of the Good Conduct Medal to indicate second and subsequent awards:

2d Award,
bronze clasp - 2 knots   |  9th Award,
silver clasp - 4 knots
3d Award,
bronze clasp - 3 knots | 10th Award,
silver clasp - 5 knots
4th Award,
bronze clasp - 4 knots |
11th Award,
gold clasp - 1 knot
5th Award,
bronze clasp - 5 knots |
12th Award,
gold clasp - 2 knots
6th Award,
silver clasp - 1 knot
|
13th Award,
gold clasp - 3 knots
7th Award,
silver clasp - 2 knots |
14th Award, gold clasp - 4 knots
8th Award,
silver clasp - 3 knots |
15th Award, gold clasp - 5 knots

 




Berlin Airlift Device  

A gold-colored, metal, miniature of a C-54 type aircraft of 3/8-inch wingspan. Awarded for service of 92 consecutive days with a unit credited with participation in the Berlin Airlift or by competent field authority on an individual basis. Qualifying service must have been entirely within the period from 26 JUN 1948 to 30 SEP 1949, inclusive.

It is worn centered on both the service and suspension ribbons of the Army of Occupation Medal, nose of aircraft pointing up, and 30 degrees to the wearer's right from the perpendicular. On the suspension ribbon of the medal, the device should be worn just above the GERMANY Clasp. (...just above the EUROPE Clasp, on the Navy Occupation Service Medal [USN-USMC-USCG] .)

Orders announcing the award of the Berlin Airlift Device will specifically award the Army of Occupation Medal to persons not otherwise eligible.

(The Air Medal was awarded for the completion of 50 flights into Berlin.)
(An Oak Leaf Cluster was awarded for each additional 50 flights.)


   


Arrowhead  Device  

A bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead 1/4-inch tall. It denotes participation in a combat parachute jump, helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing; while assigned or attached as a member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. A soldier must actually exit the aircraft or watercraft to receive assault credit. Individual assault credit is tied directly to the combat assault credit decision for the unit.

The Arrowhead Device may only be worn on the service and suspension ribbons of the:

No more than one Arrowhead device will be worn on any ribbon.


 

 

Service Stars  

A five-pointed, metal star, 3/16-inch in diameter, worn on campaign and service ribbons to denote additional award or participation in designated campaigns or operations. A 3/16-inch silver Service Star is worn in lieu of five bronze and, on the Army Sea Duty Ribbon, a 5/16-inch gold Service Star is worn for the 10th award.

3/16-inch bronze Service Stars are also affixed to the Parachutist Badges and Military Free Fall Parachutist Badges to denote participation in one to four combat parachute jumps [on Parachutist Badges retroactive to 07 Dec 1941].  The fifth combat jump is denoted by a 5/16-inch gold Service Star.


 
 

Hourglass Device  

A 5/16-inch Hourglass Device is worn on the suspension and service ribbons of the Armed Forces Reserve Medal to denote its award for length of service rather than service in a contingency operation. Under the new guidelines (1996), a bronze Hourglass now represents the first ten years of Reserve service. A silver Hourglass denotes the second ten years of service and a gold Hourglass the third ten-year period. Guard and Reserve members who complete 40 years of reserve service will now wear both gold and bronze Hourglasses.


 
 

Mobilization "M" Device  

The Secretary of Defense and the President authorized the bronze "M" Device (Summer 1996) to "...Recognize the sacrifice of our National Guard and Reserve people who are mobilized as part of the Total Force." National Guard and Reserve personnel are authorized to wear the bronze "M" device on the Armed Forces Reserve Medal for service of at least one day of active duty in support of a contingency operation on or after 01 Aug 1990.  At present, this is limited to:

M Operations DESERT SHIELD-DESERT STORM
M Operation RESTORE HOPE in Somalia
M Operation UPHOLD DEMOCRACY in Haiti
M Operations JOINT ENDEAVOR-JOINT GUARD-JOINT FORGE in the former Yugoslavia
M Operation ALLIED FORCE (Kosovo Call-up)
M Operation DESERT FOX in the Persian Gulf
M Operation NOBLE EAGLE
M Operation ENDURING FREEDOM
M Operation IRAQI FREEDOM
M Operation NOMAD SHADOW
M Operation NEW DAWN
M Operation INHERENT RESOLVE
M Operation FREEDOM'S SENTINEL

The "M" Device can be awarded only once for any single operation. However, it may be awarded more than once to members who supported more than one contingency mission. Guard and Reserve members who served in Saudi Arabia during the Persian Gulf War, then supported missions in Somalia, Haiti, or Bosnia, qualify for multiple awards.  Second and subsequent awards are denoted by the wear of an Arabic Numeral to the wearer's left of the "M" Device.


 

 

Arabic Numerals  

Arabic Numerals, 5/16-inch tall, are issued instead of a medal or ribbon for second and subsequent awards of the Air Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon, and the Reserve Components Overseas Training Ribbon. The medal/ribbon denotes the first award and the Numerals, starting with the Numeral '2', denotes the number of additional awards.

The Numeral worn on the NCO Professional Development Ribbon denotes the highest completed level of NCO development.

A Numeral is now worn on the Armed Forces Reserve Medal, in conjunction with the Mobilization "M" Device, to denote the number of contingency operations in which a soldier served subsequent to the operation for which the "M" Device was awarded. The Numeral is to be worn to the wearer's left of the "M" Device.

Arabic Numerals are also used to denote subsequent awards of the Multinational Force and Observers Medal.

The Numerals are to be centered on the ribbon when worn alone; when worn with other devices they are to be equal distance from the center and sides of the ribbon.
 



Currently, no more than four appurtenances may be worn on any, one U.S. Army ribbon.


Copyright (c) RWD Ploessl

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